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HIKING & CAMPING


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Backpacking

Backpacking


Backpacking offers freedom to the forest traveler. You become part of a scenic landscape and survive in a primitive environment with few modern conveniences. With this freedom goes an individual responsibility to care for the environment and respect the rights of those you meet along the way. Many areas are experiencing heavy use. Firewood may be scarce. Streams no longer provide safe drinking water. Help protect this fragile resource by following the “Leave No Trace” principles.

If you are planning a trip to the CLOUD PEAK WILDERNESS follow these additional regulations:

  1. Campfires, other than a self contained stove, are not allowed above 9200 feet elevation. Campfires below 9200 feet must be built on a fire blanket or in a fire pan so that they are not directly on the ground or not built within 300 feet of lakes, streams or trails.
  2. Possessing or transporting any part of a tree above 9200 feet elevation is prohibited.
  3. Camping is not permitted within 100 feet of any lake or stream. Camping at sites posted as being closed is not permitted.
  4. Camping structures such as hitching racks or tent frames must be dismantled after use.
  5. Hitching, tethering or hobbling a horse to a live tree is prohibited except while unloading. Keep hitched or hobbled horses 100 feet from a lake or stream.
  6. Group size is limited to a maximum of 10 people with a maximum of 15 head of recreational livestock in any group. Groups may have an additional 2 people in their group if a member of the group is trained in “Leave No Trace” outdoor skills and ethics and has a copy of their certification with them. Larger groups must split into separate groups for hiking and camping, and must remain a minimum of 1/2 mile apart.
  7. Cutting a trail switchback is not permitted.
  8. Possessing a wagon, cart, wheelbarrow, bicycle or other mechanical or other motorized vehicle including a game cart is prohibited.
  9. All users must register prior to entry.

Campgrounds

Coffeen Park

Coffeen Park


Elevation 8,500′ Located 9.3 miles Southwest of Big Horn, Wyoming, on County road 335, then 8 miles Southwest on Forest Road 26.
Costs $0
Water No
Handicap? No

Cross Creek

Cross Creek


Elevation 8,400′ Located 9.3 miles Southwest of Big Horn, Wyoming, on County road 335, then 8 miles Southwest on Forest Road 26.
Costs $0
Water No
Handicap? No

Dead Swede

Dead Swede


Elevation 8,400′ Located 34 miles Southwest of Dayton, Wyoming, on U.S. Highway 14, then four miles Southwest of Forest Road 26.
Costs $10
Water Yes
Handicap? No

East Fork

East Fork


Elevation 7,600′ Located 9.3 miles Southwest of Big Horn, Wyoming, on County Road 335 (becomes Forest Road 26), then 2.5 miles South.
Costs $9
Water Yes
Handicap? No

Little Goose

Little Goose


Elevation 7,000′ Located 9.3 miles Southwest of Big Horn, Wyoming, on County Road 335 (becomes Forest Road 26), then 2.5 miles South.
Costs $0
Water No
Handicap? No

North Tongue

North Tongue


Elevation 7,900′ Located 29 miles West of Dayton, Wyoming on U.S. Highway 14, then 1 mile North on Forest Road 15.
Costs $10
Water Yes
Handicap? Yes

Ranger Creek

Ranger Creek


Elevation 7,800′ Located 19.3 miles southwest of Big Horn, Wyoming on County Rd. 335/Forest Road 26.
Costs $9
Water Yes
Handicap? Yes

Sibley Lake

Sibley Lake


Elevation 7,900′ Located 25 miles southwest of Dayton, Wyoming, on U.S. Highway 14.
Costs $11/$14
Water Yes
Handicap? Yes

Tie Flume

Tie Flume


Elevation 8,400′  
Costs $10
Water Yes
Handicap? Yes

Camping

Camping


The Bighorn National Forest has 189,000+ acreas of wilderness, 1,500+ miles of trails, 30+ campgrounds and much more that provide an awesome recreation experience!

Hiking

Hiking


Hiking in the Bighorn National Forest can be an enjoyable, rewarding experience. Trails are found along lakes and streams, across grassy parklands and climbing to reach the highest mountain summits.Take responsibility for a safe memorable trip:

  1. Plan ahead.
  2. Know your abilities and limitations.
  3. Tell someone where you’re going.
  4. Carry the appropriate maps.
  5. Be aware of weather changes.
  6. Carry water, food, first-aid kit, and other essentials.

For more info on hiking, click here.

For a printable hiking guide, click here.

Wilderness

Cloud Peak Wilderness


The United States Congress designated the Cloud Peak Wilderness in 1984 with the Wyoming Wilderness Act and it now has a total of 189,039 acres. All of the wilderness is in the state of Wyoming.

Long recognized as having some of the most majestic alpine scenery in America, this region was managed as the Cloud Peak Primitive Area as far back as 1932. For 27 miles along the spine of the Bighorn Mountain Range, Cloud Peak Wilderness preserves many sharp summits and towering sheer rock faces standing above glacier-carved U-shaped valleys. Named for the tallest mountain in Bighorn National Forest–Cloud Peak at 13,167 feet–the Wilderness is blanketed in snow for a large part of the year. Most of the higher ground doesn’t show bare ground until July. On the east side of Cloud Peak itself, a deeply inset cirque holds the last remaining glacier in this range. Several hundred beautiful lakes cover the landscape and drain into miles of streams. The forest is an attractive mix of pine and spruce opened by meadows and wetlands.

Although rugged in appearance, the Bighorns are actually more gentle than other mountains in Wyoming. The area is visited each year by thousands and thousands of backpackers who hike along more than 100 miles of trails.